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And it's not just Muslims; it happens across many cultures and regions. Sinclair has been working on the project for nearly a decade.Photographer Stephanie Sinclair has traveled the world taking pictures, like the one of the Afghan couple, to document the phenomenon. She goes into the areas with help from people in these communities who want the practice to stop, because they see the harmful repercussions. I hated to see him," Tahani (in pink) recalls of the early days of her marriage to Majed, when she was 6 and he was 25.Her favorite class was Dari, the local language, before she had to leave her studies to get married. w=300&h=224 300w, sizes="(max-width: 195px) 100vw, 195px" / Amanpour asked Sinclair if the 11-year-old Afghan girl married in 2005, and others like her, consummate their marriages at such an early age.

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I hated to see him," Tahani (in pink) recalls of the early days of her marriage to Majed, when she was 6 and he was 25. The young wife posed for this portrait with former classmate Ghada, also a child bride, outside their mountain home in Yemen. Tehani and Ghada are sisters-in-law photographed with their husbands, who are both members of the military.

The young wife posed for this portrait with former classmate Ghada, also a child bride, outside their mountain home in Hajjah. Like most of the girls, Tehani didn’t even know she was getting married, until the wedding night. Tehani describes how she entered the marriage, “They were decorating my hands, but I didn’t know they were going to marry me off.

“Often you see these group marriages because the girl and the families can't afford to have three weddings.” In the five-year-old girl’s case, Rajni will continue to live with her own family for several years.

Girls aren’t always the only ones forced into marriage.

Leyualem was whisked away on a mule with a sheet covering up her face.

Sinclair asked the groomsmen why they covered her up; they said it was so she would not be able to find her way back home, if she wanted to escape the marriage. w=300&h=237 300w, sizes="(max-width: 230px) 100vw, 230px" / Sinclair travelled to India and Nepal, and photographed child marriages among some Hindus.Modern cell phones still take forever to charge, from a brisk but often still inconvenient 20 minutes to upwards of a full hour.So imagine how revolutionary a charger that’d do the job in less than half a minute might be.Sinclair wanted to photograph child marries in India and Nepal, because sometimes the boys entering a marriage are also young.“And often they're victims just as much of this harmful traditional practice,” she says.Portraits Nujoud Ali, two years after her divorce – when she was only eight years old – from her husband, more than 20 years her senior. w=300&h=241 300w" sizes="(max-width: 169px) 100vw, 169px" / Another one of the photographs Sinclair took is of a Yemeni girl named Nujood Ali.

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