2012 private sex chat

These applications claim no responsibility for explicit messages or photos that are saved.Snapchat's privacy policy on sexting has evolved to include sending content over new smartphone applications because of their appealing features such as the anonymity or temporary elements.

15 percent of these teens also claimed to have received sexually explicit photos.

This suggests a consent issue of people receiving photos without asking for them.

has received wide international media attention for calling into question the findings reported by the University of New Hampshire researchers.

In the University of Utah's study, researchers Donald S. Sustaíta, and Jordan Rullo surveyed 606 teenagers ages 14–18 and found that nearly 20 percent of the students said they had sent a sexually explicit image of themselves via cell phone, and nearly twice as many said that they had received a sexually explicit picture.

Students who had sent a picture by cell phone were more likely than others to find the activity acceptable. note: "The news-worthiness of [the University of New Hampshire study] derives from [their] figure [2.5%] being far below (by a factor of 5 or more) the prevalence rates reported in the previous surveys.

However, while technically accurate, the 2.5% figure is actually rather misleading.

Sexting thus can be considered a "behaviour that ties into sexuality and the subsequent level of relationship satisfaction experienced by both partners".

Based on the interviews conducted by Albury and Crawford, they discovered that sexting is commonly used in positive aspects.

This is enhanced with Snapchat, as the person receiving snapchats will not be aware of the contents until they open it. In a 2011 study, 54% of the sample had sent explicit pictures or videos to their partners at least once, and ⅓ of their sample had engaged in such activities occasionally.

In 2013, it was found that sexting is often used to enhance the relationship and sexual satisfaction in a romantic partnership.

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire surveyed 1,560 children and caregivers, reporting that only 2.5 percent of respondents had sent, received or created sexual pictures distributed via cell phone in the previous year.

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