Teen futanari dating site - Sexy chat online with a robot

Specifically, he read a quote from a 1984 book by Sherry Turkle, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

An interviewee, 'Anthony', told Turkle that he had tried having girlfriends but preferred his relationship with his computer.

Our first chatbot program had the name Do-A-Lot because it did more than ELIZA.

He and Cheok's "I-Friends" will have a sophisticated module which will endow the software with emotions, personality and moods.

They aim to tailor the software to any required persona, for example a girlfriend or boyfriend who will be able to take part in continual and varied sexually-charged conversations.

Levy is keen to stress the versatility of the software they're developing.

The I-Friend, he says, can be configured for any embodiment and persona that the market requires."It could, for example, be an upmarket toy such as a furry animal or a creature from another planet; or a web avatar that repeatedly turns the conversation to discuss a company and its products; or a mobile app such as a virtual girlfriend or boyfriend." Cheok adds: "In the first instance, it could probably replace all the phone sex for which people for some reason pay very high rates." Ultimately, however, the aim would be for it to be "used in robots for artificial love and sex chat". "I believe it is going to be perfectly normal that people will be friends with robots, and that people will have sex with robots," says Cheok.

"The very first chatbot was the famous ELIZA program written at MIT in the 1960s, named after Eliza Doolittle in George Bernard Shaw's ,'' says Levy.

"ELIZA did very little but caused a stir at the time and is well documented in the Artificial Intelligence literature.Eventually, Cheok believes, "almost every physical thing, every being, every body, will be connected to the internet in some way.'' The future, he says, will involve the subconscious part of the brain.We already have intimate data on the internet, but we still don't feel that we can really know somebody online.Adrian David Cheok, Professor of Pervasive Computing at London's City University, has been refining a device called a Kissinger: a set of pressure-sensitive artificial lips that can transmit a kiss from a real mouth to a similar device owned by a partner who might be thousands of miles away.The Kissinger system has been in development for about eight years, with the latest model designed to plug into a smartphone.By kissing the screen, the movements of a person's lips can be mirrored in the other machine and that kiss will be given to whoever has his or her mouth against a corresponding machine.

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