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Access this lesson's reading by clicking on the Resources tab in ANGEL, then clicking on the "Library Reserves" link. 94-95, "Postlab Problem." Record all of your work in a word processing document.

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Such scales were common in early-20th-century households and were sold by Sears and Montgomery Ward.

Many had flat weighing surfaces but some were topped by shallow pans.

The most ingenious steelyard scales could be folded against the wall they were attached to so they could be moved out of the way when not in use. To produce these scales, a manufacturer would use the resistance of a spring to calculate weights, which could be read automatically One of the most common types of spring scales was the kitchen scale—also known as a family or dial scale.

Designed for horizontal surfaces, these scales used the weight of goods in a pan at the top of the scale to force the spring down.

The discovery of radioactivity and its application to dating rocks is perhaps one of the greatest scientific achievements affecting the Earth Sciences.

With the discovery of radioactive isotopes more then one hundred years ago, scientists quickly realized that the radioactive decay of materials found in rocks could be used to date the rocks and consequently change the "relative" geologic time scale into an "absolute" time scale.Some counter scales were designed for measuring spices, others for weighing fat slices of cake.Yet another type of unequal arm balance scale was the steelyard scale, which was designed to be mounted to a wall.Made by companies such as Howe and Fairbanks, the footed tin pans of these scales were often oblong, some encircled at one end so bulk items could be easily poured into a bag.Seamless pans were typically stamped from brass and given style names like Snuff (the smallest) and Birmingham (the largest).If you have any questions about the lesson materials or assignments, post them to our online discussion forum (not e-mail). While you are there, feel free to post your own responses if you, too, are able to help out a classmate!

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