online dating in lebanon - Nigeria scam women dating photos

Because they have so much money coming in, they can wait.”The reason for the request probably meshes with the story: their passport has been lost, or their child needs a doctor, or there’s some other emergency.

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How could a mature, self-sufficient woman send such a huge sum of money to someone she never even met?

She reported the loss to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, and is now their biggest recorded victim of so-called romance fraud — a new take on the Nigerian email scam.

And the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre thinks only a small percentage of victims tell anyone what’s happened to them.

Behind the flowery words and promises of love, an investigation by CTV’s W5 and the Star has discovered, are criminal gangs, many in West Africa, running dozens of cons at once.“What we’re dealing with is organized crime,” says Daniel Williams of the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre. For the one person that contacts us about it, there are 15 who have not, and 30 who will be scammed in future.”This is how it works: A man or woman — both are at risk — signs on to a dating website. study, “at a very early stage the scammer declares their love for the victim,” and asks that they move off the dating website and onto another form of communication, such as instant messenger or private email. According to the University of Leicester study, and interviews with experts here in Canada, there are commonalities.

People familiar with romance frauds say that it’s generally not one person running a scam — so someone like “Dave” was probably several different people.

(“When we hear consumers say, ‘he’ or ‘she,’ we say it’s not a man. “It’s a dozen people working the keyboard.”)Many romance frauds end before the losses run as high as Ellen says hers was, but that doesn’t mean they are less significant, and not just in financial terms.

The amounts can build until the victim becomes suspicious, or there’s nothing left. It’s a complicated tale, which she traces back to October 2010, when a girlfriend urged her to try online dating. “So I just put it on the line and said, ‘What’s up with this? He was trying to unravel his father’s estate.”That is when it appears the scam began in earnest.

Why not, thought Ellen, even though she’d previously dipped her toe in the pool of men online, and found them wanting. Ellen says “Dave” told her he had been left a sizeable inheritance offshore, but because of a lawyer’s incompetence, he had to clear some debts before he could sell the assets.“I am of the nature that I would help anybody,” Ellen says.

“I thought it would be fun just to banter back and forth with somebody,” she says. “I said, ‘If there was no chance of you coming to Canada, I’ll come to L. “He didn’t balk at that.” But when she booked her ticket, she says, things changed. Eventually, she says, “Dave” would give her bank account numbers and she would wire him — or people purporting to act for him — wire transfers for tens of thousands of dollars, sometimes hundreds of thousands of dollars, at a time.

The man she says she met online called himself Dave Field. (Documentation provided by Ellen shows transfers of roughly

(“When we hear consumers say, ‘he’ or ‘she,’ we say it’s not a man. “It’s a dozen people working the keyboard.”)Many romance frauds end before the losses run as high as Ellen says hers was, but that doesn’t mean they are less significant, and not just in financial terms.The amounts can build until the victim becomes suspicious, or there’s nothing left. It’s a complicated tale, which she traces back to October 2010, when a girlfriend urged her to try online dating. “So I just put it on the line and said, ‘What’s up with this? He was trying to unravel his father’s estate.”That is when it appears the scam began in earnest.Why not, thought Ellen, even though she’d previously dipped her toe in the pool of men online, and found them wanting. Ellen says “Dave” told her he had been left a sizeable inheritance offshore, but because of a lawyer’s incompetence, he had to clear some debts before he could sell the assets.“I am of the nature that I would help anybody,” Ellen says.“I thought it would be fun just to banter back and forth with somebody,” she says. “I said, ‘If there was no chance of you coming to Canada, I’ll come to L. “He didn’t balk at that.” But when she booked her ticket, she says, things changed. Eventually, she says, “Dave” would give her bank account numbers and she would wire him — or people purporting to act for him — wire transfers for tens of thousands of dollars, sometimes hundreds of thousands of dollars, at a time.The man she says she met online called himself Dave Field. (Documentation provided by Ellen shows transfers of roughly $1.3 million, in U. dollars, euros and British pounds.)It appears the cash flowed out of Ellen’s investment account and into accounts in Hong Kong, Greece, Singapore — and directly to Lagos, Nigeria.Because the victims believe they are in a real relationship, they haven’t just lost their money: they’ve also lost a boyfriend or girlfriend, and the future that person had promised them.

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(“When we hear consumers say, ‘he’ or ‘she,’ we say it’s not a man. “It’s a dozen people working the keyboard.”)Many romance frauds end before the losses run as high as Ellen says hers was, but that doesn’t mean they are less significant, and not just in financial terms.

The amounts can build until the victim becomes suspicious, or there’s nothing left. It’s a complicated tale, which she traces back to October 2010, when a girlfriend urged her to try online dating. “So I just put it on the line and said, ‘What’s up with this? He was trying to unravel his father’s estate.”That is when it appears the scam began in earnest.

Why not, thought Ellen, even though she’d previously dipped her toe in the pool of men online, and found them wanting. Ellen says “Dave” told her he had been left a sizeable inheritance offshore, but because of a lawyer’s incompetence, he had to clear some debts before he could sell the assets.“I am of the nature that I would help anybody,” Ellen says.

“I thought it would be fun just to banter back and forth with somebody,” she says. “I said, ‘If there was no chance of you coming to Canada, I’ll come to L. “He didn’t balk at that.” But when she booked her ticket, she says, things changed. Eventually, she says, “Dave” would give her bank account numbers and she would wire him — or people purporting to act for him — wire transfers for tens of thousands of dollars, sometimes hundreds of thousands of dollars, at a time.

The man she says she met online called himself Dave Field. (Documentation provided by Ellen shows transfers of roughly $1.3 million, in U. dollars, euros and British pounds.)It appears the cash flowed out of Ellen’s investment account and into accounts in Hong Kong, Greece, Singapore — and directly to Lagos, Nigeria.

Because the victims believe they are in a real relationship, they haven’t just lost their money: they’ve also lost a boyfriend or girlfriend, and the future that person had promised them.

||

(“When we hear consumers say, ‘he’ or ‘she,’ we say it’s not a man. “It’s a dozen people working the keyboard.”)Many romance frauds end before the losses run as high as Ellen says hers was, but that doesn’t mean they are less significant, and not just in financial terms.

The amounts can build until the victim becomes suspicious, or there’s nothing left. It’s a complicated tale, which she traces back to October 2010, when a girlfriend urged her to try online dating. “So I just put it on the line and said, ‘What’s up with this? He was trying to unravel his father’s estate.”That is when it appears the scam began in earnest.

Why not, thought Ellen, even though she’d previously dipped her toe in the pool of men online, and found them wanting. Ellen says “Dave” told her he had been left a sizeable inheritance offshore, but because of a lawyer’s incompetence, he had to clear some debts before he could sell the assets.“I am of the nature that I would help anybody,” Ellen says.

“I thought it would be fun just to banter back and forth with somebody,” she says. “I said, ‘If there was no chance of you coming to Canada, I’ll come to L. “He didn’t balk at that.” But when she booked her ticket, she says, things changed. Eventually, she says, “Dave” would give her bank account numbers and she would wire him — or people purporting to act for him — wire transfers for tens of thousands of dollars, sometimes hundreds of thousands of dollars, at a time.

.3 million, in U. dollars, euros and British pounds.)It appears the cash flowed out of Ellen’s investment account and into accounts in Hong Kong, Greece, Singapore — and directly to Lagos, Nigeria.

Because the victims believe they are in a real relationship, they haven’t just lost their money: they’ve also lost a boyfriend or girlfriend, and the future that person had promised them.

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